Intereview – Wonder Woman (DC Universe Classics)

Welcome to the latest installment of my week-long series of “intereviews” with the line-up of the fourth wave of DC Universe Classics. My guest today is the bold and beautiful Princess Diana, a.k.a. Wonder Woman.

WW: Thank you.

Thank you, Princess. And let me add that it’s great to finally have the third member of the DC Universe Trinity in a 6″ figure from Mattel.

WW: Yes, it’s been a long time coming. But they’ve done a great job, I think.

Indeed. According to Mattel, they put a lot of work into your figure: “Special attention was paid to get the hair just right. The face paint was revised multiple times to make sure that Diana’s face wasn’t overly made- up, but instead captures the subtlety of the paint master.” Some fans were worried when the initial production samples were shown at SDCC, but it looks like those concerns were premature.

Yes, the production figures have come out great, for the most part. And I have to say, the sculpting is indeed exceptional. While initially the figure looks simple, that simplicity is deceiving–I have a very iconic look, and it can be easy to overdo it.

I agree. I notice you appear to be modeled more on the George Perez look of the 1980s than the slightly more modern look, with the hooked eagle’s beak and the broad belt.

Yes. While it’s probably good to tinker with a character’s costume over time, I like the greater symmetry of this look.

How about your paint applications? While the skin tones and the facial features are very well done–especially around the eyes–that’s an awfully bright red color they used for your uniform.

A darker red might have looked more modern. But I like the shade they used–it’s vibrant, and makes me look more “classic.”

Fair enough. Again, the flesh tones are very well done, in both texture and shade, and I like the blue tones that offset the black of your hair, which is a separate piece from the rest of the head.

There was some initial concern that you wouldn’t have thigh swivels because they might harm the sculpt too much, but those concerns, too, proved wrong. You have all the normal articulation of a DCUC figure–ball-jointed head and shoulders, H-hinge hips which allow for ball-joint like motion, swivels at the biceps, thighs, waist, and wrists, and hinges at the knees, elbows, ankles and torso. Your neck motion is a tad limited by your hair, of course…

Yes…it’s a cross all us long-haired characters must bear.

In addition to the Despero part, you also come with a labrys (double-bladed axe) and a shield. They’re pretty cool, I must say, though I’m disappointed you didn’t also come with the spear we saw in prototype photos.

Yes, it’s a shame. Perhaps we’ll get it in some sort of accessory pack from Mattycollector.com–but only if you fans demand it!

We’ll get right on that. Of course, you’ve also got your famous lasso, which is permanently attached to your hip and can’t be unrolled. That’s a little disappointing…

Yes. Yes it is. (coughs self-consciously)

Moving on. It’s important to note that you’ve got a variant in this wave, Artemis.

Yes. Her background is a bit complicated, so I’ll let you read her Wikipedia entry if you’re interested. She comes with a bow and arrows, instead of the axe and shield.

Yes, some fans seem quite taken with her. I won’t be intereviewing her because, well, I haven’t found her yet.

Thanks for sitting down with me, Princess. Despite being an inanimate piece of mass-produced plastic, you made for a surprisingly good interlocutor.

Thank you…I think.

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