Review > Captain Cold (DC Universe Classics)

Despite being far less famous, Captain Cold debuted in Showcase #8 two years before Mr. Freeze (then called Mr. Zero) appeared in the pages of Batman. While Captain Cold soon established himself as the Flash‘s archenemy, Mr. Zero remained one of Batman’s lesser foes until he was renamed and popularized by the 1960s Batman show. If the Flash had gotten a high-profile television series instead of Batman, it’s possible we would have been forced to sit through Arnold Schwarzenegger’s lethal puns in Flash and Kid Flash instead of Batman and Robin.

While casual fans may wonder why the DC universe needs two villains with such similar gimmicks, Flash fans know Captain Cold is one of the most intriguing and well-developed characters in mainstream comics. For an example of this, check out Geoff Johns and Scott Kolins’s recent Final Crisis: Rogues’ Revenge.

Packaging: The usual.

Len Snart began his criminal career by concocting a ray gun designed to interfere with The Flash’s superspeed. Instead, the weapon became irradiated accidentally, its emissions instantly freezing moisture in the air. Thus armed with his new cold-gun, Snart adopted the stylized parka of Captain Cold, a supervillain specializing in thefts and freezing solid any would-be pursuers, including the Scarlet Speedster.

Sculpt: Captain Cold gets an entirely brand-new body sculpt. It’s the Four Horsemen’s usual excellent work, from the folds of the clothing to the fur around Snart’s parka. I’m not sure what other characters could make use of this body, minus the belt and parka–any ideas?

They’ve also captured Snart’s trademark sneer–he’s not a handsome man.

The biggest problem–and I’m not sure if this should count as a sculpting issue, since it could have happened during production–is that Captain Cold is a bit short. In the comics, he’s supposed to be 6’2″, a full three inches taller than Barry Allen, but in real life this figure would be closer to 5’6″. It’s noticeable, although it’s definitely not anywhere near as bad as Sinestro.

Plastic & Paint: The figure is molded mostly in blue plastic, which feels a little more toy-like than usual here. A light paint wash might have helped to minimize that effect, and to have brought out all the great detail in the clothing.

I also think a slightly darker blue, closer to the character’s modern portrayal, would have made him more menacing and less cartoon-ish, but to be fair, these are the colors of the Silver Age Cold.

Articulation: Standard DCUC articulation.

Accessories: Captain Cold comes with his distinctive cold gun. While the design is faithful to the weapon’s look, the gun is silver instead of the distinctive magenta usually used in comics.

Personally, I think the silver makes a lot more sense than magenta, but for those of you from whom the “Classics” in DC Universe Classics really matters, the silver might bug you.

Quality control: No problems–a running theme in Wave 7, although I did hear of two separate cases where collectors got Colds with two of the same upper knee section.

Overall:

1111/20

Captain Cold features a great new body sculpt by the Four Horsemen, and represents a welcome addition to the DCUC rogues’ gallery. His flaws are that he’s a little short and could have used a paint wash. Had he been a little taller, he’d easily get another half-point.

Here’s hoping we soon see the rest of the Rogues in DCUC–particularly Heat Wave, Mirror Master, and Weather Wizard.

Comments now closed (15)

  • >>They’ve also captured Snart’s trademark sneer–he’s not a handsome man.<<

    Well, there's SNEER, and there's "OMG, I think I just sat on one of my own icicles!"

    — Sea

  • this height thing seems to be a recurring problem…Cold, Barda, Kid Flash, Sinestro…what gives?

  • Maybe Vigilante? Or maybe Lex Luthor as he appeared in the tail end of Justice League: Unlimited?

  • Hey! You forgot to mention that Captain Cold came into our homes every Saturday morning as a founding member of the Legion of Doom! That's how I first knew of him.

    Bring on the Rogues, Mattel!

    Captain Boomerang! Trickster! Pied Piper!

  • So he comes with Atom Smasher's head and is that the butt?

    @Cade- Mattel used to have a incapacity to make a villain larger than the hero. They seem to have let that go with DCUC. Kid Flash is explained by reused Robin parts. One things for sure though- less plastic makes for a cheaper product which makes for more profits. Probably not intentional on most counts but a nice bonus for Mattel

  • To be totally honest I'd no idea that Captain Cold was supposed to be particularly tall. The height definitely doesn't bother me.

    I think it's Sinestro's renowned high-forehead that makes it so noticeable with him.

  • the height issue really doesn't worry me – if he had been Capt Tall, Master of not needing a ladder to reach high-up stuff then it would be an issue, but I have no problem with him shrinking a little, after-all he's been in the freakin cold for over 40 years – that's got to do something to his bones……

  • I have no problem with his height either. Looks like a great figure for any Flash fan.

  • I thought this fig was an unnecessary entry. We got a perfectly good release in the Alex Ross line. Why waste a slot on redundancy?

  • Because those figures were targeted toward collectors and not given the same wide level of exposure that DCUC gets. Not to mention, DCUC has a history of pairing heroes with notable villains from their galleries, and Captain Cold is pretty high on the list of Flash villains.

    Also, many of us don't have the Alex Ross version, and even if we did, the scale doesn't match this line.

  • What Pete said. Though since I got Barda from DCUC I've been thinking of using the DCD Barda with the rest of my Classics because the scale problem bothers me more than I thought it would. No way Scott should be taller than Barda.

IntenseDebate supports the following HTML tags: <a> <b> <i> <u> <em> <p> <blockquote> <br> <strong> <strike> <img>