Happy Father’s Day!

dad-star-trek

I’ve always wanted to post this picture. This was taken while my dad was in college, after Star Trek had been off the air for years but before the hype returned with the Motion Picture. He’s second from left. He was one of the fans who kept the flame of Gene Roddenberry’s vision alive.

So. I come by the geekiness honestly.

 

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  • My Dad once tried to write a Star Trek novel. It involved time travel and Klingons mutating n early man, and a worldwide flood.

    • Neat! My idea for a Star Trek novel involved Klingons as well. Although no mutations, unless you count human/Klingon cross-breeds as mutation.

  • 2nd from the left makes him the highest ranking officer there! I wonder how his friends felt about that….

    • I dunno. I think the whole thing might have been his idea, so maybe he got dibs. Although I once played an RPG set in the Star Trek universe where my friends and I were the crew of a smuggler ship (so sort of like Han Solo meets Star Trek), and no one wanted to be the captain, so I (the new guy) ended up volunteering. Even under those circumstances, being the captain had a lot of responsibility.

    • Ha! No, but I will say that when I was 10 or 11 and started watching The Original Series, it was weird to watch Captain Kirk because my dad had picked up some of his mannerisms (not the over-exaggerated Shatnerisms, but little things, particularly his half-grin).

      I probably have some Picard-isms myself. Although honestly I suspect my kids will have the most deja vu when they watch any early 1990s Jim Carrey movie.

      • Do you call your wife "Number 2" and tell her to "engage" the minivan when merging onto the highway?

        Thanks for sharing the pic and story about your dad. Cool stuff. My father was not much of a geek over anything, so I'm curious what effect my geekdom will have on my kids.

  • Ever think of interviewing your dad for the site?

    I'm always curious about the fans from back in the day and what they think about nerd culture now. Would love to have some Trek perspective from that era.

    When I was a young collector many moons ago I loved getting advice and knowledge from the older folks, it definitely gave me a much more open mind and helped me learn a lot about the hobby (like how in 1975, "Mint Condition" was a completely different idea/grade than it is now, or the real difference between something that is "rare" and something that is "expensive.") It gives both the new guys and old timers like myself a different perspective on things.